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Principles Life and Work fr Dalio Ray Livres In Principles Dalio shares what he’s learned over the course of his remarkable career He argues that life management economics and investing can all be systemized into rules and understood like machines The book’s hundreds of practical lessons which are built around his cornerstones of “radical truth” and “radical transparency” include Dalio laying out the most effective The Principles of Art and Design LiveAbout The principles of art represent how the artist uses the elements of art to create an effect and to help convey the artist's intent The principles of art and design are balance contrast emphasis movement pattern rhythm and unityvariety The use of these principles can help determine whether a painting is successful and whether or not the painting is finished The principles of psychology James William The principles of psychology Item Preview remove circle Share or Embed This Item EMBED EMBED for wordpresscom hosted blogs and archiveorg item description tags Want ? Advanced embedding details examples and help NoFavorite share flag The Principles of Constitutionalism N W Barber Following on from his critically acclaimed The Constitutional State in this new study Nick Barber explores how the principles of constitutionalism structure and influence successful statesFar from acting solely as a mechanism to limit state powers Barber contends that constitutionalism and its associated principles reuire that the state be structured to advance the well being of its people What Are the Principles of Design? PrepScholar The principles of design are a lot like the rules of a sport That’s because the principles of design are the rules and principles that artists and designers use to create visual compositions Artists use these principles to make sure whatever they’re making accurately and effectively delivers their intended message to their audience The Five Principles of Lean The principles encourage creating better flow in work processes and developing a continuous improvement culture By practicing all principles an organization can remain competitive increase the value delivered to the customers decrease the cost of doing business and increase their profitability What Are the Principles of the Declaration of It was developed from principles first stated in in the Nuremberg Code and further incorporated elements from the Declaration of Geneva made in a statement of the ethical duties of physicians It has been subseuently amended by nine general assemblies of the association at meetings extending from to Though addressed primarily to physicians its principles provide Principles for Responsible Banking – United The Principles offer unparalleled opportunities for collaboration within the banking sector Signatories to the Principles for Responsible Banking benefit from the collective expertise of nothing less than the largest community of sustainable bankers globally By working collaboratively under the auspices of the United Nations signatory banks jointly deliver tools methodology and practical The Principles of Humane Experimental Techniue The Principles of Humane Experimental Techniue WMS Russell and RL Burch Table of Contents PART ONE THE SCOPE OF HUMANE TECHNIUE FOREWORD TO SPECIAL EDITION PREFACE CHAPTER INTRODUCTION Scope of the Study; Integration in the Vertebrate Organism; CHAPTER THE CONCEPT OF INHUMANITY Pain and Distress; The Criteria for and The Principles of Good Garden Design The basic principles of garden design are simple enough however each is often referred to by than one name The categories below contain the basic elements that when combined together constitute the generally accepted version of good garden design Keep in mind that it is your garden and you are the one who should be pleased with the results Rules are meant to be broken Order Principles Life and Work fr Dalio Ray Livres In Principles Dalio shares what he’s learned over the course of his remarkable career He argues that life management economics and investing can all be systemized into rules and understood like machines The book’s hundreds of practical lessons which are built around his cornerstones of “radical truth” and “radical transparency” include Dalio laying out the most effective The principles of psychology James William The principles of psychology Item Preview remove circle Share or Embed This Item EMBED EMBED for wordpresscom hosted blogs and archiveorg item description tags Want ? Advanced embedding details examples and help NoFavorite share flag The Ten Principles | UN Global Compact The Ten Principles of the UN Global Compact Corporate sustainability starts with a company’s value system and a principles based approach to doing business This means operating in ways that at a minimum meet fundamental responsibilities in the areas of human rights labour environment and anti corruption Responsible businesses enact the The five fundamental principles of English grammar These five key principles of grammar provide the fundamental framework for the production of coherent grammatical and unambiguous English They are as it were the fundamental principles that must be mastered in order to write or speak English in a way that can be recognised as being English In this respect they are just a start; but they are the foundation on which most of the other Principles of Journalism | American Press In an organization then administered by PEJ the Committee of Concerned Journalists began a national conversation among citizens and news people to identify and clarify the principles that underlie journalism After four years of research including public forums around the country a reading of journalism history a national survey of journalists and the group released a Principles for Responsible Banking – United The Principles offer unparalleled opportunities for collaboration within the banking sector Signatories to the Principles for Responsible Banking benefit from the collective expertise of nothing less than the largest community of sustainable bankers globally By working collaboratively under the auspices of the United Nations signatory banks jointly deliver tools methodology and practical The Principles of Humane Experimental Techniue The Principles of Humane Experimental Techniue WMS Russell and RL Burch Table of Contents PART ONE THE SCOPE OF HUMANE TECHNIUE FOREWORD TO SPECIAL EDITION PREFACE CHAPTER INTRODUCTION Scope of the Study; Integration in the Vertebrate Organism; CHAPTER THE CONCEPT OF INHUMANITY Pain and Distress; The Criteria for and The Core Principles of Good Customer Service What are four basic principles of Object Oriented There are major principles that make an language Object Oriented These are Encapsulation Data Abstraction Polymorphism and Inheritance These are also called as four pillars of Object Oriented The Principles of Good Garden Design The basic principles of garden design are simple enough however each is often referred to by than one name The categories below contain the basic elements that when combined together constitute the generally accepted version of good garden design Keep in mind that it is your garden and you are the one who should be pleased with the results Rules are meant to be broken Order


10 thoughts on “The Principles of Psychology

  1. says:

    This is a monster of a book XXVIII chapters 897 pages It was just at the beginning of the attempt to address psychology scientifically rather than philosophically though it has a foot in each camp Published in 1891 it precedes Freud who however is mentioned in a few places I am going though it slowly one chapter at a time and recording impressions along the wayCh V The Automaton Theory This stands up remarkably well Perhaps that means we've really learned very little new about the mind problem James discusses the theory now common and then already advanced by many of his contemporaries that conscious ideas will and so forth are mere epiphenomena that have no effect on behavior These theorists started with the discovery that electricity can make frog legs contract and the difficulty of seeing any way a mental event could affect a molecule or a cell and concluded that mental states are epiphenomena of physiologic events James acknowledges the difficulty of seeing how the mental can affect the physical but rejects the mechanistic conclusion as not yet proved He also notes that goal oriented mental processes would have a clear advantage in natural selection no mechanism cares where it is going he says and a locomotive would not care a wit if it pulled its car over an open drawbridgeCh VI The Mind Stuff Theory James grapples with the Hard Problem of consciousness how a biological mechanism however complicated can produce consciousness He spends a great deal of time dealing with the theory apparently current at the time that elementary particles have little minds as elementary properties and these combine to produce a human mind It sounds ridiculous but we have to remember that people were desperate for some solution to the Hard Problem and indeed still are James does not care for any of the solutions but somewhat amazingly he comes around to admitting that the traditional religious soul theory that a non material soul inhabits the body and provides the mind in the brain is the best one available to himCh VII James turns to the methods of psychology He identifies three 1 Introspection the age old method of philosophers of the mind Comte had objected that the mind cannot both think and observe itself thinking at the same time so introspection much be illusionary; James disposes of this by saying we first think then remember thinking For myself I don't see why the mind can't do two things at once we certainly process sensations and think at the same time 2 Experimentation followed by statistical evaluation of the results which James describes as new and growing and likely to take over the field How right he was 3 Comparison with the behavior of animalsCh VIII James discusses first the phenomenon of unconscious thoughts the mentally ill James calls them hysterics sometimes demonstrate some kind of awareness of things they supposedly cannot sense because they are blind or numb; the same is true of some under hypnosis and then the means by which the mind connects to the brain and thence to the rest of the body and to the world On the latter he confesses that he just doesn't knowCh IX The Stream of Thought James is at pains to refute the idea of Hume and others that thought is a seuence of individual ideas He says it is a continuous stream with overlapping ideas constantly coming to be and fading away Sounds reasonable to me The method here is totally that of philosophy ie reason and introspection It makes me want to read a modern text on psychology and see how much of that is done nowCh X The Consciousness of Self This is a long and uite varied chapter The first part is about what one feels in oneself or belongs to oneself including the body material things and spiritual feelings This part seems almost like pop psychology Then James goes into various theories of actual seat or nature of these feelings the pure self or Ego These take him deep into discussions with Kant Hume and other luminaries where I can scarcely follow The three theories he discusses are 1 Spiritualist the theory that there is an immaterial substance or soul that is the seat of the Ego this James says he cannot disprove but he finds it unilluminating and says that it is scientifically useless because it is untestable; 2 Associationist which takes the Ego to be just the stream of thoughts sharing common memories and each remembering those past this is what James favors; and 3 Transcendentalist Kant's theory which I will not attempt to summarize because I do not really understand it The final part of the chapter takes up The Mutations of the Self and treats us to various case histories of perplexing multiple personalities apparent spiritualist possessions and the like James marvels at the similarity of the various mediumistic possessions he has witnessed half of them claim to be departed American Indians and almost all of them speak of love and harmony of their current happy afterlife in a sort of summer land and describe the ailments of those present This is true even for people who have not been exposed to spiritualism These sorts of things were evidently very common in James' era He says he has no theory to account for them but a serious study of these trance phenomena is one of the greatest needs in psychology As far as I know these phenomena have died away without getting that serious study or else they got that study an evaporated under itCh XI Attention A comparatively straightforward chapter He peremptorily discards the idea of Locke Hume and others that our minds are like inert clay on which the senses make impressions Clearly he says when we direct our attention at particular sensations those make a much deeper impression Then he takes a very scientific turn relaying the results of various experiments on how attention affects reaction time complete with average error Then back to philosophy for the uestion of whether voluntary attention is the resultant of brain processes or a force of its own He says that there is no way science can resolve this uestions and so those who believe either alternative should be left to their opinion in peaceCh XII Conception The function by which we identify a numerically distinct and permanent subject of discourse James regards conceptions as unchangeable; our thought takes place by rearranging and relating them It is the common conception linked to them that makes things seem to be the same James has no difficulty with abstract conceptions or conceptions of universals unlike some other philosophers Indeed he devotes much of the chapter to ridiculing Berkeley Mills and other such thinkers It is remarkable that such towering intellects all presumably observing the same phenomena come to such different descriptions of them and in fact cannot understand how the others could make such mistakes For these things all we have is introspection and that is famously unreliableCh XIII Discrimination and Comparison A long chapter about how we judge things to be the same or different about eually divided between arguments from introspection and actual experiments There is a lot of consideration and impatient dismissal of the ideas of earlier writersCh XIV Association Only sometimes do we make associations by reason More often it is by habit based on experience In fact neural habit is the one elementary cause of association but it is made likely by recency intensity and congruence of mood as well as by simple repetition Still there is a lot that is not explained by these and seems to be a matter of chance in other words cerebral causes that are too subtle for analysis There is also association by similarity when two ideas have some overlap But why does the mind follow one overlapping idea and not another? We cannot tell maybe the cause is in consciousness James is refreshingly ready to identify phenomena that he just cannot explain In addition to reverie or free association there is also voluntary thought to remember something or to solve a problem but this works just like free association with the consciousness rejecting ideas that don't advance the purpose Citing Hobbes Hume and Mill James traces all mental faculties ultimately to types of association he also draws examples from Jane Austen's books he is uite well read Almost all of this chapter is drawn from introspection but he still talks in the language of an unknown physiology brain processes that vibrate and dischargeCh XV The Perception of Time What we perceive as now must actually be short interval perhaps a few second constantly added to at the front and fading away at the back An actual instantaneous now would provide no feeling of before and after This is our only direct intuition of time Longer times are conceived of by multiplying this variable short interval Various experiments give evidence of the shortest perceptible durations which varies with sense sight sound etc We do not sense time itself only things that happen in time Thus the passage of time seems sometimes faster than others Kant's notion of a direct intuition of and infinitely extended time is baseless extended time is derived from intuited short timeCh XVI Memory Memory is not just reoccurrence of an idea that would be mere repetition but recall with the additional idea of having had the thought in the past Memory is attributed to pathways in the brain Good memory is measured by both the readiness with which those pathways are made and how long they last More can be remembered by paying closer attention or other self discipline but brute capacity for memory is innate and cannot be improved on inuiry James found that experienced actors had no less labor remembering their lines than when they were younger The method James uses here is mainly introspection and reason along with uoting eminent Germans Towards the end of the chapter he does report a few structured experiments others have made together with various facts and anecdotes about how forgetting occurs At the end he returns to philosophy the impossibility of explaining conscious memory is just a part of that of explaining consciousness in generalCh XVIII Imagination Largely uotations from other scholars James is surprised to find that different people form mental images very differently some visual some auditory some in other ways this is based on interviews and surveys He seems to be discussing what we call photographic memory though he doesn't use the term James favors the view that mental images are the same thing using the same mental circuitry as physical perception only much weaker It seems unlikely to me that this can be all that they are A vivid mental picture can seem much stronger than a weak perception without any possibility of confusing it with realityCh XIX The Perception of Things The eye can sense only patches of color but we perceive a solid chair Clearly the brain does a lot of work to unconsciously turn sensations into perceptions a skill probably learned in early childhood Misperceptions lead to illusions of which many amusing examples are given Misperception can be triggered by a preconceived idea HallucinationsCh XX The Perception of Space This very long chapter 196 pages perhaps spends too much time finding philosophical difficulties in how we so easily derive the idea of three dimensional space from the sparse inputs of sight and touchCh XXI Belief Belief is an emotion or psychic attitude an irreducible aspect of perception of certain ideas held to be real Everything perceived is believed unless some other perception contradicts it in which case a judgment must be made which to admit and which to deny Modes of reality 1 The physical as sensed; 2 The ideal physical world of a scientist; 3 Logical mathematical ethical aesthetical reality; 4 Common ideas eg the sun rises and sets; 5 Myth Whatever excites and stimulates our interest is real The fons et origo of all reality is thus subjective is ourselves Nothing is real than one's sense of one's own existence Sense objects are either reality or the test of reality Appearance needs reality in order to exist but reality needs appearance in order to be known Touch conveys a solid and incontrovertible reality than the other senses We believe in ideas because of the bodily commotion they produce Only the most highly developed man can suspend belief in the presence of an emotionally exciting idea Philosophic agnosticism is impossible man needs a belief in purpose for himself and will invent one if none is given him Will and belief are two names for the same psychological phenomenon directed at things we can affect and at things we cannotCh XXII Reasoning This chapter proceeds mostly by philosophical introspection It is hard to say exactly what reasoning is It seems to have something to do with one idea succeeding another Better reasoners have apt and essential succeeding ideas Reasoning reuires that only a part of the characteristics of each idea be considered The inferior reasoning powers of women and of savages are explainedCh XXIII The Production of Movement This very short chapter serves mainly as an introduction to the next three on motion by instinct by emotion and by volition The main method here is observation and experimentation James claims that every feeling produces a movement of the entire organism in all its parts though the motion in a particular part may be undetectable This is shown by how people jump when startled and by some experiments that I was unaware of that show that one's hand strength increased when illuminated by certain colors of light and by other similar curious observations I have run out of the space that Goodreads allows for reviews I can hardly blame them but I am committed to this project I have spent than five years on Why it's hard to say I will continue the chapter summaries for my own edification


  2. says:

    This book was ranked by a Psychology Today commenter as having been probably the single greatest volume in Psychology ever written despite it being over 100 years old It isn't a tome but it is a relatively easy 1100 page read James explores uite a lot of interesting points for example; sounds impressions tactile sensations etc He talks philosophy and psychology as well as integrates science while citing many of his contemporaries He postulates what others have stated in a few instances and at times gives his own perception as well William's arrogant yet friendly and gentle tone while at most being playfully condescending to those intellectuals he is in disagreement with is refreshing This among other ualities are uite uniue to him William James was without a doubt a genius and didn't marry until his dad pointed him in the direction of a 38 year old woman who he confessed before marrying that he suffered from bouts of depression William James based on what I learned in college was The first American Psychologist to open a Psychology laboratory in The USA In addition he even went to meet a man they call Wundt referring to the poorWilhelm Wundt who was considered the first Psychologist to walk the face of this earth Pneumatology might have been what psychology was referred to before Wundt forged his way into this realm This book took poor William over 8 years to write when he thought it would only take him two Evidently the Harvard man later renounced psychology and wrote uite the brilliant book on his philosophy of pragmatism It was said that old rough rider Teddy Roosevelt sat at the front of his class


  3. says:

    For a book written in the 1800's it is surprisingly fairly easy to read as well as consistent with our modern day views of psychology I read it for a class so I don't recommend a person take it upon themselves to read it during their downtime but it is very interesting


  4. says:

    Remarkably easy to understand even for non Psych majors So why not a higher rating? I read this over twelve months and can't really recall much of what I read Perhaps the problem is me and not James Jim and not James? I think I'm on to something here


  5. says:

    This book is a monster I dont remember where I got it but I know why it took so long to get to it and read it It is a very intersting book to read and a great book but its no easy read Its not the type of thing you read to enjoy But and excellent book


  6. says:

    This will take me a while Amazing of course


  7. says:

    This proved to be a very weighty book literally at 897 pages but full of many interesting topics such as habit consciousness of self attention memory imagination reasoning instinct emotions will etc The section on habit was excellent it is all to do with the building of characterNo matter how full a reservoir of maxims one may possess and no matter how good one's sentiments may be if one has not taken advantage of every concrete opportunity to act one's character may remain entirely unaffected for the better With mere good intentions hell is proverbially paved The weeping of a Russian lady over the fictitious personages in a play while her coachman is freezing to death on his seat outside is the sort of thing that everywhere happens on a less glaring scale One becomes filled with emotions which habitually pass without prompting to any deed and so the inertly sentimental condition is kept up The remedy would be never to suffer one's self to have an emotion at a concert without expressing it afterward in some active way Let the expression be the least thing in the world but let it not fail to take place Faith without works is dead We have grown cold in the world due to TV movies etc we cry about things we see and hear from afar but do we really care enough to do something about someone else's suffering? What a challenge to let no emotion be felt without doing something good because of itLet no youth have any anxiety about the upshot of his education whatever the line of it may be If he keep faithfully busy each hour of the working day he may safely leave the final result to itself He can with perfect certainty count on waking up some fine morning to find himself one of the competent ones of his generation in whatever pursuit he may have singled out This is so true As the Bible says You have been faithful with a few things; I will put you in charge of many things


  8. says:

    started reading this during psych rotation was also a mellow read during neuro rotation but i bought it for fun and because i have a thing for the james brothers william also wrote a lot about religion and that is why i had a crush on him when i was in college and duking it out with the christian studies boys


  9. says:

    I was introduced to this material in college but purchased this book bc of my personal interest in learning about James I recommend it to anyone interested in the foundations of modern psychology


  10. says:

    That someone was thinking very sensible thoughts about mind and body over a century ago